The Gospel and the Church

‘The very nation and city on which the faithful mentioned in Hebrews staked their entire lives were fulfilled in Christ’s ministry to be received by the faithful of his generation and every generation thereafter. It is as false as it is common to reduce this scriptural prophecy to an ethereal, post-mortem fate for those who dress up to go to religious service providers once a week, where they sing songs, listen to clergymen recite sophistry, call this the extent of their Christian obligation, and still have the audacity to say “Lord, Lord“.

Perhaps most of the problem of the confusion between what modern Christians believe and what the early Christians practiced lies within the scope of the meaning of the word “Gospel“, and how the definition cannot be contextually or essentially separated from civil and political implications; for the exact same reason why every would-be political savior (god) has a political campaign message (gospel) for societal redemption and reformation (salvation). Contrary to popular assumption, the term “gospel” was not invented for Christian use concerning Christ’s message, but was assimilated and repurposed as a sort of plagiarized competition with the message of the efficacy of Roman citizenship.

This homogenization of rhetoric is not exclusive to the word “Gospel” either, but also to words like “Providence” and “Ekklesia“, which modern Christians recognize as “church”, but is intended to mean something similar to “political party.” It is important to note two things here: Firstly, that the Christian co-opting of these terms did not change their original meanings from something political to something hyperspiritual and esoteric, and secondly, that this competition between civil jurisdictions was not exclusive to that of early Christian society and Roman society, but was and is categorically between every kingdom of “this world” and the Kingdom of Heaven.’

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